Terminal

Ubuntu - Make Terminal Look Like Green Black Matrix Style Command Line and Transparent

By default, Ubuntu has a rather boring terminal. It features a solid purple background, no transparency, and white text. To make it look matrix style with green on black text and a transparent window, follow these steps:

Open a terminal window:

Ubuntu Terminal Matrix Style 1

Click on Edit > Profile Preferences:

Ubuntu Terminal Matrix Style 2

On the Colors tab, uncheck "Use colors from the system theme" and then select Green on Black from the "Built-in Schemes" list:

Ubuntu Terminal Matrix Style 3

On the Background tab, select "Transparent Background" and adjust the slider bar to your preferred level of transparency:

Ubuntu Terminal Matrix Style 4

You now have a transparent, green on black, matrix style terminal window!

Ubuntu Terminal Matrix Style 5

Linux - Find Total and Free Disk Space from Command Line or Terminal

To find the total and free disk space in Linux operating systems such as Ubuntu and openSUSE, you need to use the df command. Here is an example:

 

df -h
 
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1       913G  481G  386G  56% /
udev            2.0G  4.0K  2.0G   1% /dev
tmpfs           807M  1.2M  805M   1% /run
none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none            2.0G  2.7M  2.0G   1% /run/shm
cgroup          2.0G     0  2.0G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
 
If you run df without any switches, it will give you the same output, but in Kilobytes. If you want to learn how to find total and free disk space in Windows, check out this tutorial.

mv - Move All Files Including . Hidden Files - How To for Linux Unix

By default, the mv command will not move files in the source directory that begin with . (also known as hidden files). If you want to move all files (including hidden files that begin with a dot .), run mv like this:

 mv ./{*,.*} /destination/directory/here 

 ​Below are some examples of a directory structure before and after running mv:

./
├── level1
│   ├── 1
│   │   ├── one.txt
│   │   └── .two.txt
│   ├── 2
│   │   ├── .four.txt
│   │   └── three.txt
│   ├── five.txt
│   └── .six.txt
└── level2

mv ./level1/* ./level2/

./
├── level1
│   └── .six.txt
└── level2
    ├── 1
    │   ├── one.txt
    │   └── .two.txt
    ├── 2
    │   ├── .four.txt
    │   └── three.txt
    └── five.txt

As you see ./level1/.six.txt did not move because it was in the source directory and it was a hidden file. If you were to move it the correct way, it would work and look like this:

mv ./level1/{*,.*} ./level2/

.
├── level1
└── level2
    ├── 1
    │   ├── one.txt
    │   └── .two.txt
    ├── 2
    │   ├── .four.txt
    │   └── three.txt
    ├── five.txt
    └── .six.txt

 

How to Get Public External IP From Command Line Terminal - Linux

If you are trying to find out what your public external IP address is, you typically go to a web site specifically for this purpose, such as ipchicken.com or whatsmyip.org. Thanks to cURL, you can easily do this from the command line too. To install cURL, run the following command:

  • Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install curl
  • openSUSE: sudo zypper install curl

To find out what public IP you are using, run this command:

curl ifconfig.me

A single line will be returned containing your public external IP address.

 

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